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No, you can’t unilaterally opt out of Facebook’s terms and keep using it

Facebook has updated its terms of service and data use policy recently and the changes have upset many people. I’ve started seeing more declarations of users’ intention to opt-out of provisions of Facebook’s terms and conditions. These sorts of declarations seem to be legally binding with their fairly legalistic language but they don’t work except to help you feel better.…

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Revisiting “front page of the newspaper” wisdom

I’ve been preparing for my presentation at the Advertising and Marketing Law Conference on 15 October and reading through some materials I’ll probably reference in my slides. One paragraph just stood out for me in Anil Dash’s article “What is Public?“: The conventional wisdom is “Don’t publish anything on social media that you wouldn’t want to see on the front page…

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BYOD, data security and the BlackBerry Experience

I am moderating what will almost certainly be a fascinating discussion about BYOD, enterprise data security and device management at the BlackBerry Experience event at Montecasino in Fourways, Johannesburg today. The event is hosted by BlackBerry in partnership with ITWeb Events and will also take place in Durban and Cape Town later this month. The speakers at the event will…

Facebook defamation is not necessarily illegal

That the respondent in the latest High Court Facebook defamation case, M v B, was ordered to remove defamatory posts on Facebook isn’t remarkable. What is more interesting about that case is that it reiterates a principle that a court will not step in and proactively block future defamatory posts. The applicant in this case, M (SAFLII redacts personal information…

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Privacy is contextual and social, less legal and technical

Privacy is more than a couple settings and a consent checkbox on a form somewhere. Privacy and publicity seem to be pretty straightforward concepts and, legally, they are treated fairly superficially and defined mechanically. A result of that is a similarly superficial treatment in conversations about privacy and publicity in social and commercial engagements which rarely touches on what privacy…

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According to The Guardian, Apple has imposed contractual restrictions on developers that prohibit them from sharing health data they may receive through an anticipated range of health-related apps which iOS 8 will usher in through a platform called HealthKit:

Its new rules clarify that developers who build apps that tap into HealthKit, of which Nike is rumoured to be one, can collect the data it holds.

But, they stated, the developers “must not sell an end-user’s health information collected through the HealthKit APIs to advertising platforms, data brokers or information resellers”. Although, the rules add that they could share their data with “third parties for medical research purposes” as long as they get users’ consent.

These sorts of apps have enormous potential to benefit consumers and, at the same time, they represent a profound risk to consumers because our most intimate personal information is being accessed. How developers and device manufacturers handle this data is bound to inform a new generation of privacy complaints and reputational harm case studies in the years to come.

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Rewritten WASPA Code better regulates mobile services in SA

The new WASPA Code of Conduct is a complete rewrite of the Wireless Applications Service Providers’ Association’s rules which regulate the mobile content and services industry in South Africa. One of the biggest changes to the Code is a consolidation of the old Advertising Rules and the Code of Conduct itself along with a dramatically scaled down body of rules…