Wanting privacy shouldn’t be conflated with having something to hide

Memeburn has a good article titled Privacy is worth protecting, even if you have nothing to hide which is a great reminder that privacy isn’t about having something to hide. There are many valid reasons to insist that your right to privacy be respected:

The reason most often given for failing to consider digital privacy in our day-to-day lives is that, if we have nothing to hide, there’s no need to. Others, meanwhile, take the line of thinking proffered by those institutions caught eavesdropping and argue that monitoring metadata alone — information about, for example, which telephone number you called when and for how long, rather than the content of the call itself — doesn’t amount to an infringement of privacy.

Both of these arguments are fundamentally flawed. Wanting privacy shouldn’t be conflated with having something to hide. There are plenty of legitimate reasons for people to want to keep certain things private – from their religious or political affiliation to their sexual orientation or drunken photos they’d rather family or employers (current or potential) didn’t see. For political dissidents living under repressive regimes, meanwhile, privacy can be a matter of life or death.

Here are two other perspectives:

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