How to deal with stalkers taking photos of you

I spoke to Kieno Kammies on 567 CapeTalk radio this morning about a troubling trend. As you can hear from the segment, below, the concern is partly about people being photographed in suspicious ways in public. One example is a person following women around shooting video of them or taking photos without their knowledge. This isn't so much about a person taking a photograph of a scene that happens to include women walking past but actually targeting those women.

Whether this is a privacy issue depends very much on the subject matter and the context. In this respect it comes down to legitimate expectations of privacy in the case of adults and appropriate consent when it comes to children (at least in terms of the Protection of Personal Information Act). The law that is likely to be more appropriate here is the Protection from Harassment Act which targets forms of harassment which the Act defines as follows:

"harassment" means directly or indirectly engaging in conduct that the 5 respondent knows or ought to know-

(a) causes harm or inspires the reasonable belief that harm may be caused to the complainant or a related person by unreasonably-

(i) following, watching, pursuing or accosting of the complainant or a related person, or loitering outside of or near the building or place where the complainant or a related person resides, works, carries on business, studies or happens to be;

(ii) engaging in verbal, electronic or any other communication aimed at the complainant or a re.lated person, by any means, whether or not conversation ensues; or

(iii) sending, delivering or causing the delivery of letters, telegrams, packages, facsimiles, electronic mail or other objects to the complainant or a related person or leaving them where they will be found by, given to. or brought to the attention of, the complainant or a related person; or

(b) amounts to sexual harassment of the complainant or a related person;

The harm the Act protects against may be "any mental, psychological, physical or economic harm".

This Act is designed to be user friendly and the Regulations describe which forms to use for which steps and who to approach at each step. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has a comprehensive page with links to the Act, the Regulations and the various forms. The process was designed in such a way that you don't need an attorney to assist you (although you can have one helping you) and you need not know the harasser's identity either. The Act creates a mechanism whereby the police may be instructed to investigate and identify the suspected harasser.

This legislation can be used for a various activities which fall into the "harassment" definition including stalkers like the ones described in the segment as well as cyber-bullying and more.

Your email providers don't require a warrant to read your email

Your email providers don't require a warrant to read your email

Our email providers give themselves much more convenient access to your data through their terms of service or privacy policies. On one hand, this is level of access may be necessary to prevent disruptions and limit liability but, on the other hand, these permissions we, as users, grant providers like Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and others pretty broad access to our data without requiring them to obtain court orders or satisfy any external legal requirement.

Brands, accurate facial recognition and why transparency is critical

Brands, accurate facial recognition and why transparency is critical

Introducing accurate facial recognition into the mix potentially removes the need for you to tell Facebook (or a future Facebook connected site or app) who you are before your data is shared and your experience modified. All you will need to do now is show up and let a camera see you long enough to capture a reasonably clear image of your face. From there you will be identified, placed into a particular context and things will happen. As a brand, there are some interesting opportunities. Imagine your guests arrive at your event and, instead of relying on guests to manually check in, a webcam at the door connected to your Facebook Page recognises the guests as they arrive and posts an update in your stream sharing their arrival. This isn't happening yet but it is very possible. 

Digital marketing law interview on @BallzRadio

Paul was interviewed about aspects of digital marketing law on Ballz Radio today. The interview was part of the business segment and Paul chatted to the team about some consumer protection issues, transparency, terms and conditions and privacy concerns.

Fortunately, Ballz Radio publishes the audio and video of the interviews. You can listen to the audio using the SoundCloud player below:

EU and US data protection regimes compared

European Union Expansion Celebration by Rock Cohen, licensed CC BY SA 2.0

European Union Expansion Celebration by Rock Cohen, licensed CC BY SA 2.0

Phil Lee at the Privacy and Information Law Blog has a great comparison of European and American data protection regimes which is worth reading. This is particularly relevant to South Africa as the Protection of Personal Information Act places some emphasis on transferring personal information to countries with compatible data protection systems.

The looming domain name war that brands should be preparing for

The looming domain name war that brands should be preparing for

A lot of new generic Top Level Domains ("gTLDs") are becoming available and their emergence is making life pretty interesting for brands which have to carefully take stock of which gTLDs could have an impact on their trademarks and which domains they should register to protect themselves. To complicate the situation even further, the roll-out is a phased roll-out and some of these new gTLDs include local South African gTLDs like .joburg, .capetown and .durban. Brands that don't understand the registration process are going to lose out of potentially valuable domains, each of which could threaten their brands and trademarks,