No, you can’t unilaterally opt out of Facebook’s terms and keep using it

Facebook has updated its terms of service and data use policy recently and the changes have upset many people. I’ve started seeing more declarations of users’ intention to opt-out of provisions of Facebook’s terms and conditions. These sorts of declarations seem to be legally binding with their fairly legalistic language but they don’t work exceptContinue reading “No, you can’t unilaterally opt out of Facebook’s terms and keep using it”

Facebook Messenger is not the privacy threat you should be concerned about

Many people are focused on the permissions they give Facebook when they install Facebook Messenger and are concerned that they are giving Facebook excessive access to their devices. This isn’t necessarily the case and this growing panic may be more a function of how Android permissions have to be obtained than a real privacy threatContinue reading “Facebook Messenger is not the privacy threat you should be concerned about”

A transparent approach to privacy policies

Richard Beaumont’s article “Transparency Should Be the New Privacy” echoes a point I’ve also been making recently: data protection or privacy is mostly about transparency and trust. Sure, compliance is essential but from a data subject or consumer’s perspective, how transparent you are about how your process the data subject’s personal information and whether yourContinue reading “A transparent approach to privacy policies”

Your email providers don’t require a warrant to read your email

Our email providers give themselves much more convenient access to your data through their terms of service or privacy policies. On one hand, this is level of access may be necessary to prevent disruptions and limit liability but, on the other hand, these permissions we, as users, grant providers like Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and others pretty broad access to our data without requiring them to obtain court orders or satisfy any external legal requirement.

Using Netflix in South Africa is illegal

South Africans continue to be frustrated by the paucity of legitimate and convenient TV and movie download or streaming options. At the moment DSTV and a limited South African iTunes store are the primary options. Unfortunately this doesn’t seem to be enough so more and more consumers are looking to popular video rental service, Netflix, for their entertainment needs. The problem is that Netflix content isn’t legally available in South Africa and its likely for the same reason that the local iTunes store lacks TV and some movie content: licensing restrictions.

You are a soldier in Google’s Cold War with Facebook for social dominance

The underlying dynamic that likely drives Facebook’s and Google’s amendments to their policy and terms frameworks is that we users tend to place more value on recommendations from our friends and family. Facebook and Google’s advertising and promotional models (as well as a number of other services that personalise ads) are increasingly designed to manufacture these recommendations using our activities on the various services without the need for us to actively apply our minds to what we are recommending and what we choose not to. At the moment, the dominant model is one in which we choose to signify our approval of a brand, product or service by Liking or +1’ing it. These changes start to make those actions less important as a recommendation signal and are made possible through contractual models which include privacy policy frameworks and terms and conditions.

LinkedIn’s expanded and more intelligible privacy policy

LinkedIn recently announced an update to its privacy policy and user agreement in a blog post titled Updating LinkedIn’s Privacy Policy. Although LinkedIn updated the user agreement too, the emphasis was more on updates to its privacy policy. The new policy expands on a number of issues and reinforces the extent to which users needs to take responsibility for their actions when using the service.

Thoughts about legal frameworks in the near future

We attended the Deloitte Tech Trends 2013 event at the Wanderers Club yesterday. It is an annual event and we had an opportunity to hear from several Deloitte executives, including Mark White, Deloitte’s Global CTO. Although the discussion focused on technology trends and how businesses are (and can) incorporate them into business processes (the emphasisContinue reading “Thoughts about legal frameworks in the near future”