When it comes to data protection, transparency and trust are essential

When it comes to privacy, two key success factors are transparency that engenders trust. Responsible data processing is how you move from transparency to trust. I wrote an article about this which I published on LinkedIn (it was also published on MarkLives) which I titled “Trust is more important than sales“. You may find itContinue reading “When it comes to data protection, transparency and trust are essential”

A transparent approach to privacy policies

Richard Beaumont’s article “Transparency Should Be the New Privacy” echoes a point I’ve also been making recently: data protection or privacy is mostly about transparency and trust. Sure, compliance is essential but from a data subject or consumer’s perspective, how transparent you are about how your process the data subject’s personal information and whether yourContinue reading “A transparent approach to privacy policies”

SnapChat privacy is not what you think

SnapChat’s privacy controls are what made it both enormously popular and troubling to its young users’ parents. When SnapChat launched, it gave users the ability to share photos and videos which promptly vanished into the ether. This appealed to its typically young and privacy conscious users because they finally had a way to share stuffContinue reading “SnapChat privacy is not what you think”

How to deal with stalkers taking photos of you

I spoke to Kieno Kammies on 567 CapeTalk radio this morning about a troubling trend. As you can hear from the segment, below, the concern is partly about people being photographed in suspicious ways in public. One example is a person following women around shooting video of them or taking photos without their knowledge. ThisContinue reading “How to deal with stalkers taking photos of you”

Your email providers don’t require a warrant to read your email

Our email providers give themselves much more convenient access to your data through their terms of service or privacy policies. On one hand, this is level of access may be necessary to prevent disruptions and limit liability but, on the other hand, these permissions we, as users, grant providers like Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and others pretty broad access to our data without requiring them to obtain court orders or satisfy any external legal requirement.

Brands, accurate facial recognition and why transparency is critical

Introducing accurate facial recognition into the mix potentially removes the need for you to tell Facebook (or a future Facebook connected site or app) who you are before your data is shared and your experience modified. All you will need to do now is show up and let a camera see you long enough to capture a reasonably clear image of your face. From there you will be identified, placed into a particular context and things will happen. As a brand, there are some interesting opportunities. Imagine your guests arrive at your event and, instead of relying on guests to manually check in, a webcam at the door connected to your Facebook Page recognises the guests as they arrive and posts an update in your stream sharing their arrival. This isn’t happening yet but it is very possible. 

Digital marketing law interview on @BallzRadio

Paul was interviewed about aspects of digital marketing law on Ballz Radio today. The interview was part of the business segment and Paul chatted to the team about some consumer protection issues, transparency, terms and conditions and privacy concerns. Fortunately, Ballz Radio publishes the audio and video of the interviews. You can listen to theContinue reading “Digital marketing law interview on @BallzRadio”

EU and US data protection regimes compared

Phil Lee at the Privacy and Information Law Blog has a great comparison of European and American data protection regimes which is worth reading. This is particularly relevant to South Africa as the Protection of Personal Information Act places some emphasis on transferring personal information to countries with compatible data protection systems.