Are banks assessing your creditworthiness based on your social media profiles?

GigaOm has an interesting article titled "New breed of lenders use Facebook and Twitter data to judge borrowers" which looks at a growing trend in financial services industries. Banks and other lenders are starting to look at customers' social media profiles when assessing their needs and the risks they may pose as debtors. An emerging South African consumer protection framework could support extension of this behaviour to South Africa, if it hasn't already been adopted.

POPI compliance and your plan to fail

Unfortunately many companies may have left their preparation too late, especially the larger companies, and have not yet established a complete set of practices and processes to ensure their compliance with POPI’s many requirements. Although companies will likely have a year before many of POPI’s compliance requirements go into effect, a year is simply not enough time to prepare adequately. Compliance isn’t just a matter of writing a privacy policy and publishing that. In order to comply with POPI, organisations have to ensure that all their underlying processes are aligned with POPI’s requirements. In this sense a privacy policy is really more of a description of a series of data protection practices which have been implemented throughout the organisation. If there is a disconnect between your organisation’s practices and processes and what the privacy policy describes, the consents you are hoping to obtain through the privacy policy will amount to little more than lip service to the legislative framework it serves.

Is privacy a recent fiction or a neglected human right?

Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, Vint Cerf, recently spoke at the FTC’s Internet of Things Workshop where he suggested that privacy is a recent construct our society created when technology made it possible. Is privacy an anomaly, as he suggests, or is it an important right which technology has enabled and which we are neglecting to the point where we are negating it so we can share more stuff with each other?

PPC Lead Generation’s Privacy Risks

PPC lead generation is a search-based lead generation technique which leverages search terms to surface (preferably) relevant ads in search results. When you click on those ads you are often taken to landing pages where you have the option of submitting your details to a company so it can get in touch with you about its products and services. It’s a pretty smart marketing option because it begins with the premise that you are searching for what the company offers. It is also a potentially risky proposition for brands that fail to implement adequate privacy protections.

You are a soldier in Google’s Cold War with Facebook for social dominance

The underlying dynamic that likely drives Facebook's and Google's amendments to their policy and terms frameworks is that we users tend to place more value on recommendations from our friends and family. Facebook and Google's advertising and promotional models (as well as a number of other services that personalise ads) are increasingly designed to manufacture these recommendations using our activities on the various services without the need for us to actively apply our minds to what we are recommending and what we choose not to. At the moment, the dominant model is one in which we choose to signify our approval of a brand, product or service by Liking or +1'ing it. These changes start to make those actions less important as a recommendation signal and are made possible through contractual models which include privacy policy frameworks and terms and conditions.

Consent for Direct Marketing Under POPI

The Protection of Personal Information Act has particular interest for direct marketers because of the likely substantial impact the legislation will have on consumer-facing initiatives when it goes into effect. POPI has a section that deals specifically with and introduces a consent model designed for direct marketing. It is an interesting model and I'll explain why in this post.

Facebook Graph Search won’t change your privacy settings

Facebook is launching its Graph Search product shortly and one of the questions a number of people have asked is how this new feature affects their privacy on Facebook? The main concern many people have is that Graph Search will enable other users who are not necessarily their friends to locate them and discover previously restricted information about them. Fortunately this is not likely to be the case. Facebook, as with other major services, has become far more sensitive to users' concerns and has taken a few steps to reassure users.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑