Which contracts photographers should consider using

Which contracts your clients should sign A photographer asked a great question about contracts recently: I would like to redo my contracts. Would like to know what do you get clients to sign before a shoot? Disclaimer: This note is a fairly broad overview of many of the major themes you, as a photographer, shouldContinue reading “Which contracts photographers should consider using”

Apple tells developers not to share health data with advertisers

According to The Guardian, Apple has imposed contractual restrictions on developers that prohibit them from sharing health data they may receive through an anticipated range of health-related apps which iOS 8 will usher in through a platform called HealthKit: Its new rules clarify that developers who build apps that tap into HealthKit, of which NikeContinue reading “Apple tells developers not to share health data with advertisers”

Sharing more with Facebook to improve its value

This point in Kevin O’Keefe’s article titled “Facebook eliminating the junk in your News Feed” on Facebook “click bait” made an interesting point about using Facebook more to improve its value to you as a user: All too lawyers and other professionals I speak with complain about all the junk they see on Facebook. PartContinue reading “Sharing more with Facebook to improve its value”

A transparent approach to privacy policies

Richard Beaumont’s article “Transparency Should Be the New Privacy” echoes a point I’ve also been making recently: data protection or privacy is mostly about transparency and trust. Sure, compliance is essential but from a data subject or consumer’s perspective, how transparent you are about how your process the data subject’s personal information and whether yourContinue reading “A transparent approach to privacy policies”

Brands, accurate facial recognition and why transparency is critical

Introducing accurate facial recognition into the mix potentially removes the need for you to tell Facebook (or a future Facebook connected site or app) who you are before your data is shared and your experience modified. All you will need to do now is show up and let a camera see you long enough to capture a reasonably clear image of your face. From there you will be identified, placed into a particular context and things will happen. As a brand, there are some interesting opportunities. Imagine your guests arrive at your event and, instead of relying on guests to manually check in, a webcam at the door connected to your Facebook Page recognises the guests as they arrive and posts an update in your stream sharing their arrival. This isn’t happening yet but it is very possible. 

Your connected home knows you intimately and, soon, so will Google

Google’s business model, like many other consumer-facing companies’ business models, are changing to become far more context aware. We’re seeing that in apps that know our location and where we are going next and warn us when to leave to make it on time. That just scratches the surface and this trend can be tremendously helpful and useful if we can be sure that our personal information is not being abused or vulnerable to exploitation.

Don’t place too much emphasis on the Protection of Personal Information Act

With the Protection of Personal Information Act signed and likely to be implemented to some degree sometime this year, it is fashionable to focus on POPI when thinking about data protection and privacy. While POPI is a very important Act, a complete data protection review has to take into account much more. I prepared aContinue reading “Don’t place too much emphasis on the Protection of Personal Information Act”

Facebook still uses you to sell ads, even without sponsored stories

Facebook recently announced that it has stopped allowing users and brands to create new sponsored stories. Instead, it requires brands and users to purchase ads to promote themselves. [M]arketers will no longer be able to purchase sponsored stories separately; instead, social context — stories about social actions your friends have taken, such as liking aContinue reading “Facebook still uses you to sell ads, even without sponsored stories”

Are banks assessing your creditworthiness based on your social media profiles?

GigaOm has an interesting article titled “New breed of lenders use Facebook and Twitter data to judge borrowers” which looks at a growing trend in financial services industries. Banks and other lenders are starting to look at customers’ social media profiles when assessing their needs and the risks they may pose as debtors. An emerging South African consumer protection framework could support extension of this behaviour to South Africa, if it hasn’t already been adopted.