Nokia’s errant F-bomb tweet and a reputational smear

Although the tweet was almost certainly not sanctioned by Nokia’s marketing team, it highlights the importance of carefully managing not only access to a brand’s social profiles and establishing clear guidelines for people who do have access to those profiles explaining what acceptable behaviour and content are because whatever is published using those platforms is going to be perceived as representative of the brand to some degree. Aside from the obvious reputational smear, consider the economic impact of a brand that is perceived to have taken a strong stand against its customers, especially at a time when it is undergoing considerable transformation.

You are a soldier in Google’s Cold War with Facebook for social dominance

The underlying dynamic that likely drives Facebook's and Google's amendments to their policy and terms frameworks is that we users tend to place more value on recommendations from our friends and family. Facebook and Google's advertising and promotional models (as well as a number of other services that personalise ads) are increasingly designed to manufacture these recommendations using our activities on the various services without the need for us to actively apply our minds to what we are recommending and what we choose not to. At the moment, the dominant model is one in which we choose to signify our approval of a brand, product or service by Liking or +1'ing it. These changes start to make those actions less important as a recommendation signal and are made possible through contractual models which include privacy policy frameworks and terms and conditions.

Yes, you can be sued for sharing a defamatory Facebook post or tweet

A common and persistent misconception about social media is that the ordinary legal rules don’t apply. I still remember the incredulous tweets around the time of the Oscar Pistorius bail application from people who were astonished that a tweet can be defamatory. How often have you retweeted something amusing or even outrageous without a second thought about the possibility that you could be sued for that simple action? As the law stands, both in South Africa and elsewhere, this is a very real risk so the next time you see something scandalous and are about to reshare it, think again.

ANN7 sings the Streisand Effect blues

News channel ANN7 has been the object of both considerable ridicule and controversy lately. On the one hand, the 24 hour news channel launched by the similarly controversial Gupta family has been criticised for poor production values and content and, on the other hand, an Indian company known as Aiplex Software has been filing take down notices with YouTube in an effort to remove a growing number of satirical videos targeting the fledgling station.

Facebook Graph Search won’t change your privacy settings

Facebook is launching its Graph Search product shortly and one of the questions a number of people have asked is how this new feature affects their privacy on Facebook? The main concern many people have is that Graph Search will enable other users who are not necessarily their friends to locate them and discover previously restricted information about them. Fortunately this is not likely to be the case. Facebook, as with other major services, has become far more sensitive to users' concerns and has taken a few steps to reassure users.

The growing importance of online sentiment to stock markets

The notion that online sentiment is a critical risk factor, especially in the context of stock markets and share trades, is gaining momentum. Australian Dionne Lew, the CEO of The Social Executive, wrote an article for Leading Company titled “Social media: Love it or loathe it, the ASX says you can no longer ignore it” in which she highlights the increasing impact online sentiment in services like Twitter and blogs (still relevant and important after all these years) has on companies’ bottom lines, particularly in the context of stock exchanges.

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