Community feedback: be careful what you wish for

A recent New York Police Department attempt to engage with New Yorkers serves as a reminder that crowdsourcing positive feedback doesn’t always work quite as well as you may hope, if it works at all. As Ars Technica reported: The Twitterverse was abuzz Tuesday evening after the New York City Police Department made what itContinue reading “Community feedback: be careful what you wish for”

Brands, accurate facial recognition and why transparency is critical

Introducing accurate facial recognition into the mix potentially removes the need for you to tell Facebook (or a future Facebook connected site or app) who you are before your data is shared and your experience modified. All you will need to do now is show up and let a camera see you long enough to capture a reasonably clear image of your face. From there you will be identified, placed into a particular context and things will happen. As a brand, there are some interesting opportunities. Imagine your guests arrive at your event and, instead of relying on guests to manually check in, a webcam at the door connected to your Facebook Page recognises the guests as they arrive and posts an update in your stream sharing their arrival. This isn’t happening yet but it is very possible. 

Fake White House bombing tweet craters stock markets

The Associated Press Twitter profile was hacked yesterday and a fake tweet about a bombing at the White House was published. The result was dramatic, the US stock market plummeted and only recovered about 10 minutes later when AP tweeted that it had been hacked and since locked its Twitter profile down.

Defamation law’s chilling effects on social media

If you look to recent cases, you generally see this issue arising in the context of politicians and sports personalities whose indiscretions are published online (usually Twitter) and disseminated rapidly. Embarrassed plaintiffs and applicants approach courts, indignant, and seek to silence the debates and expressions of schadenfreude. The courts, applying the law as they understand it to this new medium, grant orders which sometimes just seem to be out of touch with new realities. What concerns me about these cases is that simply applying these legal principles to this new, unprecedented landscape can, and often does, have a chilling effect on freedom of expression. 

First National Bank and its marketing consent problem

Innovative bank, FNB, has a consent problem. Jason Elk published a blog post over the weekend titled “FNB, what on earth are you doing to your customers?” in which he took issue with a consent mechanism FNB has been making use of or some time now. Essentially, this consent mechanism requires that customers agree toContinue reading “First National Bank and its marketing consent problem”

Privacy, reputation and vacation ownership

I was asked to present at the 2012 VOASA Conference in Durban and I thought I would share my presentation slides and a few other relevant links and materials with you, my readers and clients, as well as the conference delegates in this post. The two other lawyers presenting at the event were asked toContinue reading “Privacy, reputation and vacation ownership”

Reputation and social marketing: the legal stuff

I spoke at the Marketing Legislation Seminar in Rosebank this morning. My topic was basically online reputation management and related legal principles and issues. This area seems like something of a fuzzy marketing thing but the more I look into it the more it becomes an organisational imperative with serious legal ramifications. I’ve mentioned theContinue reading “Reputation and social marketing: the legal stuff”

Converting angry customers into happy ones

This week has been a fairly light week from a blog post perspective and I thought I would end off the week with something a little different and which is pretty relevant to most of my clients. This video is of a talk given by Rob La Gesse from Rackspace. La Gesse is pretty forthrightContinue reading “Converting angry customers into happy ones”

The blogger, the taxi company and the Streisand Effect

The Streisand effect is a primarily online phenomenon in which an attempt to censor or remove a piece of information has the unintended consequence of causing the information to be publicized widely and to a greater extent than would have occurred if no censorship had been attempted. It is named after American entertainer Barbra Streisand,Continue reading “The blogger, the taxi company and the Streisand Effect”